surfer looks at northern lights on march 9 2018 in utakleiv northern picture

Catching Waves North of the Arctic Circle

Surfing in Norway is not for the faint of heart.

Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images

Norway is not a place most would expect to find on a list of top surfing destinations, but the country's Lofoten Islands are quickly becoming just that. What used to be an extreme surf spot for seasoned thrill-seekers, is quickly becoming a popular stop for families looking to catch some waves and camp under the Northern Lights.

Known as the world&#39;s most northern surfing destination, the temperature in the turbulent waters of the Norwegian Sea averages about 45 degrees but can dip down into the 30s during winter. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images Known as the world's most northern surfing destination, the temperature in the turbulent waters of the Norwegian Sea averages about 45 degrees but can dip down into the 30s during winter. The frigid temperatures haven&#39;t stopped surfers from around the globe who come for the rugged terrain and wild waters that are not typically found in more popular (and crowded) surfing spots, like Hawaii and Australia. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images The frigid temperatures haven't stopped surfers from around the globe who come for the rugged terrain and wild waters that are not typically found in more popular (and crowded) surfing spots, like Hawaii and Australia. Some of the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/23/sports/surfing-unstad-norway-lofoten-masters.html"target="_blank">first recorded surfers</a> in this area were Thor Frantzen and Hans Egil Krane, who began riding the waves of Norway&#39;s Lofoten Islands in 1963. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images Some of the first recorded surfers in this area were Thor Frantzen and Hans Egil Krane, who began riding the waves of Norway's Lofoten Islands in 1963. The area remained relatively unknown until the early 1990s when Surfing Magazine joined a group of surfers on a trip to Lofoten. But it was the early 2000s when the scene really began to grow beyond the hardcore surfing crowd. Pictured: An aerial view shows a surfer walking through a maze of beach rocks after a swim. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images The area remained relatively unknown until the early 1990s when Surfing Magazine joined a group of surfers on a trip to Lofoten. But it was the early 2000s when the scene really began to grow beyond the hardcore surfing crowd. Pictured: An aerial view shows a surfer walking through a maze of beach rocks after a swim. Advances in wetsuits have allowed surfing enthusiasts to push far beyond tropical beaches and warm waters. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images Advances in wetsuits have allowed surfing enthusiasts to push far beyond tropical beaches and warm waters. Allowing more and more people to surf extreme coastlines like Norway&#39;s Lofoten Islands. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images Allowing more and more people to surf extreme coastlines like Norway's Lofoten Islands. The winter is the best time to catch big waves, but beginners may prefer the summer when swells are low and the Gulf Stream warms the water to a more bearable 50 degrees. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images The winter is the best time to catch big waves, but beginners may prefer the summer when swells are low and the Gulf Stream warms the water to a more bearable 50 degrees. Inexperienced surfers can also travel to surrounding spots on the coastline to find smaller waves that suit their comfort level. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images Inexperienced surfers can also travel to surrounding spots on the coastline to find smaller waves that suit their comfort level. Or simply enjoy the view. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images Or simply enjoy the view.
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