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Puerto Rico, Six Months After Hurricane Maria

Aerial photos show the island's road to recovery following last September's devastating storm.

Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

On September 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, knocking out power and further devastating an area that had been hit by Hurricane Irma weeks earlier. The official death toll from the storm was 64 people, with more than 1,000 dying in the following weeks due to dire conditions. Now, six months later, take a look at the island's slow road to recovery.

Considered one of the most logistically challenging natural disasters in modern U.S. history, the Category 4 storm destroyed nearly 400,000 homes and caused an estimated $100 billion in damages. (Pictured: An aerial view shows one of the most important roads in Humacao, Puerto Rico on October 2, 2017, and six months later on March 17, 2018.)
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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images Considered one of the most logistically challenging natural disasters in modern U.S. history, the Category 4 storm destroyed nearly 400,000 homes and caused an estimated $100 billion in damages. (Pictured: An aerial view shows one of the most important roads in Humacao, Puerto Rico on October 2, 2017, and six months later on March 17, 2018.)
Hurricane Maria devastated the country's infrastructure and caused the longest blackout in U.S. history.  (Pictured: Juana Matos neighborhood in Catano, Puerto Rico.)
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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images Hurricane Maria devastated the country's infrastructure and caused the longest blackout in U.S. history. (Pictured: Juana Matos neighborhood in Catano, Puerto Rico.)
Six months after the storm, more than 100,000 people remain without power and fresh water is still scarce for many residents who are desperate for help. (Pictured: Before and after images show a damaged road in Humacao, Puerto Rico on October 2, 2017, and six months later on March 19, 2018.)
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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images Six months after the storm, more than 100,000 people remain without power and fresh water is still scarce for many residents who are desperate for help. (Pictured: Before and after images show a damaged road in Humacao, Puerto Rico on October 2, 2017, and six months later on March 19, 2018.)
According to the AP, of the $23 billion congressionally approved funds pledged to Puerto Rico, only $1.27 billion for its federal assistance nutrition program and $430 million for public infrastructure has been disbursed so far. (Pictured: An aerial view of La Plata River in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico.)
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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images According to the AP, of the $23 billion congressionally approved funds pledged to Puerto Rico, only $1.27 billion for its federal assistance nutrition program and $430 million for public infrastructure has been disbursed so far. (Pictured: An aerial view of La Plata River in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico.)
According to a recent estimate, more than 135,000 people have fled to the U.S. mainland since the storm. The study, conducted by the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at New York's Hunter College, found that more than 40 percent of those who left have settled in Florida, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania. (Pictured: An aerial view of the Roman Baldorioty de Castro highway in San Juan, Puerto Rico.)
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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images According to a recent estimate, more than 135,000 people have fled to the U.S. mainland since the storm. The study, conducted by the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at New York's Hunter College, found that more than 40 percent of those who left have settled in Florida, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania. (Pictured: An aerial view of the Roman Baldorioty de Castro highway in San Juan, Puerto Rico.)
Before and after images show Roman Baldorioty de Castro highway in San Juan, Puerto Rico on September 24, 2017, and six months later on March 19, 2018.
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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images Before and after images show Roman Baldorioty de Castro highway in San Juan, Puerto Rico on September 24, 2017, and six months later on March 19, 2018.
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