Yingxiu Town 10 Years After The Giant Earth Quake

China’s Devastating Earthquake, 10 Years On

The disaster was one of the worst in the country's history.

On May 12, 2008, a 7.9-magnitude earthquake shook a mountainous area of Sichuan Province, Southwestern China. The quake, which lasted two minutes, resulted in the deaths of more than 87,000 people, destroyed 1.5 million houses, and altered the lives of millions more in the already impoverished region. Ten years later, destroyed villages have been rebuilt, but the scars of the earthquake are still visible. (Pictured above: A visitor pays tribute at a memorial in Yingxiu village, Wenchuan county.)

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Windows of the Xuankou Middle School building, which was later preserved as part of a memorial for the Sichuan earthquake, are seen in Yingxiu village, Wenchuan county on March 30, 2018. The 2008 earthquake struck in the early afternoon, shortly after students returned to classes from lunch break. Official statistics put the number of students killed in the affected areas at 5,000, and many parents believed the high death toll was a result of shoddily constructed school buildings.

10 Year Anniversary Of Giant Wenchuan Earth Quake - A Qiang Village Wang He/Getty Images

The Sichuan Earthquake leveled the Radish Village, which has 4,000 years of history and is home to the people of Qiang, an ethnic minority group. All of its 226 houses were destroyed or severely damaged. Soon after the earthquake, the Chinese government pledged to spend more than $100 billions rebuilding the affected areas in Sichuan, where an estimated 15 million people reside. In 2010, Qiang residents moved into their new homes constructed next to the ruins of the old Radish village.

10 Year Anniversary Of Giant Wenchuan Earth Quake - A Qiang Village Wang He/Getty Images

A Qiang woman dressed in traditional clothing is seen in the Radish Village. The Qiangs, whose name means “shepherds” in Chinese, were a nomadic group closely related to the Tibetans. Today, most of them live in the hilly areas in Sichuan on the edge of the Tibetan Plateau and rely on fruit growing as their main source of livelihood.

10 Year Anniversary Of Giant Wenchuan Earth Quake - A Qiang Village Wang He/Getty Images

A model of the old Radish Village is on display at its new site.

10 Year Anniversary Of Giant Wenchuan Earth Quake - A Qiang Village Wang He/Getty Images

Guocheng Wang, 54, a Qiang ethnic minor, returns to what is left of his destroyed home in the old Radish village on March 28, 2018.

10 Year Anniversary Of Giant Wenchuan Earth Quake - A Qiang Village Wang He/Getty Images

A calendar with a portrait of Mao Zedong lies in the rubble of Wang’s home.

10 Year Anniversary Of Giant Wenchuan Earth Quake - A Qiang Village Wang He/Getty Images

Today, Wang works as a keeper for a traditional Qiang mansion that used to house the tribe’s king. The building, made from wood and mud, was heavily damaged in the earthquake. The local government later repaired it in an effort to preserve the culture and attract tourists.

10 Year Anniversary Of Giant Wenchuan Earth Quake - A Qiang Village Wang He/Getty Images

Night falls in the Radish Village on March 28, 2018.