SYRIA-CONFLICT-PARKOUR

Syrians Practice Parkour on the Streets of Aleppo

A group of young parkour masters are defying gravity in the war-torn area of Syria.

The Syrian city of Aleppo has endured years of destruction amid a brutal civil war that ended in 2016 with the government of President Bashar al-Assad regaining control of the city from rebel forces.

But amid the chaos and turmoil, a team of seven young Syrians have taken to the war-torn streets of eastern Aleppo to practice the jaw-dropping art of parkour.

Parkour comes from the French word &quot;parcours,&quot; a military obstacle course developed in the early 20th century. The gravity-defying sport we know today was later mastered in the 1980s by French stunt coordinator David Belle. GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP/Getty Images Parkour comes from the French word "parcours," a military obstacle course developed in the early 20th century. The gravity-defying sport we know today was later mastered in the 1980s by French stunt coordinator David Belle. Parkour practitioners are called traceurs. A traceur&#39;s goal is to get from one point to another in the fastest, most efficient way possible, usually by running, climbing, jumping, and scaling walls. For traceurs in eastern Aleppo, the terrain includes semi-destroyed building and stark reminders of war. GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP/Getty Images Parkour practitioners are called traceurs. A traceur's goal is to get from one point to another in the fastest, most efficient way possible, usually by running, climbing, jumping, and scaling walls. For traceurs in eastern Aleppo, the terrain includes semi-destroyed building and stark reminders of war. Two young Syrians backflip off a wall in Aleppo on April 7, 2018. GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP/Getty Images Two young Syrians backflip off a wall in Aleppo on April 7, 2018. But the risks that come with flipping off rooftops and leaping across piles of rubble are not enough to deter these Syrian thrill-seekers from practicing this &quot;uplifting&quot; sport. GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP/Getty Images But the risks that come with flipping off rooftops and leaping across piles of rubble are not enough to deter these Syrian thrill-seekers from practicing this "uplifting" sport. Two young men practice parkour in Aleppo on April 7, 2018. GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP/Getty Images Two young men practice parkour in Aleppo on April 7, 2018. &quot;I took up parkour to escape the negative energy and psychological tensions in the city,&quot; one young traceur <a href="http://www.france24.com/en/20180409-youths-bring-parkour-syrias-war-battered-east-aleppo"target="_blank">told AFP</a>. &quot;The aim of doing it in Aleppo is to conquer fear, as we&#39;re doing it in a dangerous area, not made for this type of sport.&quot; GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP/Getty Images "I took up parkour to escape the negative energy and psychological tensions in the city," one young traceur told AFP. "The aim of doing it in Aleppo is to conquer fear, as we're doing it in a dangerous area, not made for this type of sport."