Jeff Bridges, John Goodman And Steve Buscemi In A Scene From The Movie The Big Lebowski

7 Box Office Flops With Insane Cult Followings

Proof that you can never judge a film by its earnings.

In Hollywood, just because a film flops at the box office that doesn't mean it won't leave a lasting legacy. In fact, some of the most beloved movies of all time weren't immediately embraced when they premiered. From "Blade Runner" to "The Big Lebowski," take a look back at seven cult classic films that were totally misunderstood when they hit theaters.

Blade Runner (1982) Archive Photos/Getty Images Blade Runner (1982) Ridley Scott's thriller may be regarded as one of the greatest sci-films ever made, but it wasn't an immediate hit. The film earned just $26 million when it was first released, which was not even enough to recoup the enormous $30 million budget it took to make the film. Over time, the moveie became more and more popular, eventually leading to a sequel 35 years later with 2017's "Blade Runner 2049." (Pictured: Daryl Hannah as Pris in a scene from "Blade Runner") A fan puts on the final touches to her Pris costume at the London Super Comic Con on September 25, 2017. Yui Mok - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images A fan puts on the final touches to her Pris costume at the London Super Comic Con on September 25, 2017. The Warriors (1979) Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images The Warriors (1979) When "The Warriors" first came out, the fantasy thriller about street gangs living in New York City spurred sporadic acts of violence and vandalism across the country, prompting Paramount Pictures to pull print advertisements and compensate theaters for security guards. Budgetary setbacks aside the film remains a cult classic, almost 40 years later. (Pictured: Tom McKitterick, Marcelino Sanchez, David Harris, Terry Michos, Michael Beck, Brian Tyler, and Deborah Van Valkenburgh in a scene from "The Warriors") Fans pose as The Warriors during New York Comic Con on October 10, 2014. Daniel Zuchnik/Getty Images Fans pose as The Warriors during New York Comic Con on October 10, 2014. Showgirls (1995) Murray Close/Sygma via Getty Images Showgirls (1995) Not only did "Showgirls" tank at the box office, but it also took home Worst Picture, Worst Actress, and Worst Director at the 16th annual Golden Raspberry Awards. But sometimes something so bad can turn out great, and in 2015 the film was listed as one of the top-selling MGM DVDs of all time. (Pictured: Elizabeth Berkley on the set of "Showgirls") Hundreds gather at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery for a screening of 'Showgirls' on June 27, 2015. Michael Buckner/Getty Images Hundreds gather at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery for a screening of 'Showgirls' on June 27, 2015. This Is Spinal Tap (1984) Ebet Roberts/Redferns This Is Spinal Tap (1984) Like many of the films on this list, "This Is Spinal Tap" didn't immediately find its audience. Some attribute this to the fact that many at the time thought it was a real documentary. Director Rob Reiner told Newsweek in 2010, "Everyone said, ‘Why would you make a movie about a band that no one has heard of?’" (Pictured: Spinal Tap at CBGB's in New York City on May 6, 1984) Spinal Tap lookalikes spotted at a Halloween Party for the Los Angeles NPR radio station on October 29, 2011. Michael Tullberg/Getty Images Spinal Tap lookalikes spotted at a Halloween Party for the Los Angeles NPR radio station on October 29, 2011. The Big Lebowski (1998) Mondadori Portfolio/Mondadori via Getty Images The Big Lebowski (1998) 1998 was a big year for movies, but it was not a big year for "The Big Lebowski." The classic Coen brothers film, which now has its own fan festival and religion called "Dudeism," only brought in $5.5 million on opening weekend, $10 million shy of its original budget. "Lebowski" fans at the West Hollywood Halloween Carnaval on October 31, 2017. Chelsea Guglielmino/Getty Images "Lebowski" fans at the West Hollywood Halloween Carnaval on October 31, 2017. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) Now a cult classic celebrated the world over, "Rocky Horror" was initially pulled from some theaters due to small audiences. A few years later, the film was playing across the country every weekend, thanks to midnight screenings where fans became a part of the action, a tradition that continues to this day. (Pictured: Richard O'Brien, Tim Curry, and Patricia Quinn in a scene from "The Rocky Horror Picture Show") "Rocky Horror" fans in Toronto line up for a screening of the film at the Roxy Cinema on May 8, 1983. Frank Lennon/Toronto Star via Getty Images "Rocky Horror" fans in Toronto line up for a screening of the film at the Roxy Cinema on May 8, 1983. Dazed and Confused (1993) Dazed and Confused (1993) This classic stoner coming-of-age film may boast such names as Matthew McConaughey, Ben Affleck, and Milla Jovovich, but back in 1993, those stars were not all that well known. "Dazed And Confused" made under $8 million at the box office, barely covering its $6.9 million budget. Though not a box office success, the film received glowing reviews and eventually made its way into the hearts of millions. (Pictured: Rory Cochrane, Jason London, and Sasha Jenson in a scene from "Dazed And Confused") Matthew McConaughey talks to reporters and fans at the 10th-anniversary screening of "Dazed and Confused" in Austin, TX, on May 31, 2003. Matt Archer/Getty Images Matthew McConaughey talks to reporters and fans at the 10th-anniversary screening of "Dazed and Confused" in Austin, TX, on May 31, 2003.