Winnie the Pooh author A.A. Milne's son, Christopher Robin, sitting at home with his teddy bear.

Photos of the Real Christopher Robin and His Pooh

Meet the boy — and the real stuffed animals — behind 'Winnie-the-Pooh.'

For decades now, millions of readers have been charmed by Christopher Robin, the sweet, fictional friend to Winnie-the-Pooh, Tigger, Eeyore, and other creatures who live and play in the Hundred Acre Wood. But the boy in the tale was based on a real kid: Christopher Robin Milne, the son of "Winnie-the-Pooh" author A.A. Milne. With the new Disney movie "Christopher Robin" building on the Pooh franchise with a story of the character all grown up (and played by Ewan McGregor), here's a look at the real-life inspiration and his magical toys.

UNSPECIFIED - OCTOBER 09: The English novelist Alan Alexander Milne (1882-1956) author of the story Winnie the Pooh, here with his son Christopher Robin Milner (1920-1996), photo by Howard Coster, 1926 - English novelist Alan Alexander Milne who wrote the story of Winnie the Pooh (1926) here with his son Christopher Robin Milner, picture by Howard Coster, 1926 - father and child father and child (Photo by Apic/Getty Images) Apic/RETIRED/Getty Images A.A. MILNE AND CHRISTOPHER ROBIN As early as 1924, when his son was almost 4, writer Milne mentioned in a poem a teddy bear inspired by Christopher's toy Edward. He changed the name to Winnie-the-Pooh (after a London Zoo bear who came from Winnipeg) the following year, in a Christmas short story that was published by The Evening News. In 1926, that same story was included in Milne's first official "Winnie-the-Pooh" book. Pictured: An undated picture of author, son, and stuffed animal. British writer Alan Alexander Milne entertains his son, Christopher Robin Milne in the nursery where Winnie the Pooh was born in his country home, Cotchford Farm, in Hartfield, East Sussex. (Photo by PA Images via Getty Images) PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images HORSEY Father and son in the nursery of their country home, Cotchford Farm, in East Sussex. Christopher Robin Milne would later say that the grounds around the house inspired pieces of the Hundred Acre Wood — an old walnut tree, for example, was the basis for Pooh's home.

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1926-Mrs. A.A. Milne hugging her son, Christopher Robin. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive HIS MOTHER Circa 1926, Christopher hugs mom Dorothy. circa 1925: Christopher Robin, son of the author A A Milne, about whom the latter wrote his famous Winnie the Pooh series of children's books. (Photo by Sasha/Getty Images) Sasha/Getty Images BIG IMAGINATION A boy and his (apparently medieval) toys, circa 1925. circa 1925: Christopher Robin Milne, immortalized with his toy bear Winnie-the-Pooh in his father A A Milne's children's classics, playing in a toy canoe in his nursery. (Photo by Sasha/Getty Images) Sasha/Getty Images INSIDE HIS ROOM A.A. Milne and his son Christopher Robin, around the time of the publication of Winnie-the-Pooh. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive TWO WRITERS In his own 1975 book, "The Enchanted Places," Christopher Robin Milne described going to boarding school at age 9, a traumatic experience that, he wrote of those years he was bullied, "began that love-hate relationship with my fictional namesake that has continued to this day." December 1950: Winnie the Pooh awaiting his fans in a bookstore. (Photo by George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images) George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images THE REAL WINNIE (A.K.A. EDWARD) In 1950, coinciding with a new U.S. publication of Milne's books, LIFE magazine covered a tour of Christopher's old playthings. "[Publisher] E.P. Dutton has insured the toys for $50,000 and [A.A.] Milne likes them so much, just the way they are, that he sent them to the U.S. only after getting a promise they would not be cleaned but would be returned to England as dirty and motheaten as when they left." December 1950: Featuring Eeyore the donkey toy, character from Winnie the Pooh toys. (Photo by George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images) George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images THE REAL EEYORE December 1950: Featuring the Piglet toy, character from Winnie the Pooh toys, who was once chewed by a dog. (Photo by George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images) George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images THE REAL PIGLET From the February 1951 LIFE story: "Piglet, who was once chewed by a dog, is the most bedraggled of all the animals." December 1950: Featuring Tigger the tiger, character from Winnie the Pooh toys. (Photo by George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images) George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images THE REAL TIGGER December 1950: Featuring Kanga the kangeroo toy, character from Winnie the Pooh toys. (Photo by George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images) George Skadding/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images THE REAL KANGA 21st April 1948: Christopher Robin Milne, immortalized with his toy bear Winnie-the-Pooh in his father A A Milne's children's classics, and his fiancee Lesley de Selincourt. (Photo by J. Wilds/Keystone/Getty Images) J. Wilds/Getty Images ALL GROWN UP Christopher Milne grew up to study at Cambridge and serve in World War II. Here, in 1948, the 27-year-old poses with his cousin and soon-to-be wife, Lesley de Selincourt. After marrying they'd open a bookstore in the English town of Dartmouth. Author Christopher Robin Milne unveiling a statue of a bear, in honor of his father A A Milne and his creation Winnie the Pooh, at London Zoo, September 1981. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images) Keystone/Getty Images A LASTING LEGACY In 1981, with young readers looking on, Christopher Milne unveils a London Zoo statue of a bear in honor of the work of A.A. Milne (who died in 1956). UNSPECIFIED - OCTOBER 09: Christopher Robin Milner 1920-1996 English novelist, son of Alan Alexander Milne (1882-1956) who inspired the story Winnie the Pooh, photo by Adam Marcus, 1928 - Christopher Robin Milner, son of English novelist Alan Alexander Milne who wrote the story of Winnie the Pooh (1926), picture by Adam Marcus, 1928 - Children and child literature child literature childhood and cuddly plush toy popular child (Photo by Apic/Getty Images) Apic/RETIRED/Getty Images A BOY AND HIS BEAR For some time, Christopher Milne wrote in his memoir, he felt a sense of resentment that his father "had got where he was by climbing on my infant shoulders, that he had filched from me my good name and had left me with nothing but the empty fame of being his son." He even gave away his childhood toys to his editor, who in 1987 donated them to the New York Public Library. But writing his own book seemed to give Christopher, who died in 1996, a sense of peace. "Believe it or not," he once said, "I can look at those four ['Winnie-the-Pooh'] books without flinching."



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