ENGLAND - MAY 06: One of a series of photographs illustrating the process of manufacturing matches at the Bryant & May Match Factory in Garston, near Liverpool. A sample batch of match heads is being examined by a worker. The Garston Match factory in Liverpool employed nearly 900 people until its closure in 1994. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images)

19 Strange Photos of Jobs That Are Weirder Than Yours

You think your job is a nightmare?

In the years after WWII, while London was rebuilding its cities — not to mention its collective confidence — Walter Nurnberg began photographing Britons hard at work. At the time, his groundbreaking use of studio lighting techniques within England's factories, labs, and manufacturing facilities gave his pictures a unique sense of drama and heroism; today, they have a different effect: They make innocuous jobs look downright evil.

ENGLAND - MAY 29: Taylor-Walker Brewery, Manchester. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images CLEANING A BREWERY ENGLAND - MAY 06: A group of volunteers immerse their hands in a bowl of soap solution to test the effects of a particular brand on their skin. The Consumer and Product research company in Newcastle pioneered research into the effects and practicability of contemporary products. Photographed by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography in Britain after WWII by using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images TESTING SOAP

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ENGLAND - MAY 06: One of a series of photographs illustrating the process of manufacturing matches at the Bryant & May Match Factory in Garston, near Liverpool. A sample batch of match heads is being examined by a worker. The Garston Match factory in Liverpool employed nearly 900 people until its closure in 1994. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images INSPECTING MATCH HEADS ENGLAND - MAY 29: Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images OPERATING ON A DOG ENGLAND - MAY 29: Photographed at Ship Carbon, Chadwell Heath by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images HOLDING CARBON ELECTRODES ENGLAND - MAY 06: Originally captioned as ?Decorating a Christmas tree ? a scene in the English Electric Nelson Research Laboratories where high voltage power circuit breakers were made. The lab was one of the largest short-circuit testing installations in the world. The design and manufacture of power generation and transmission equipment advanced during the 1950s as a result of developments like this. English Electric produced equipment for some of the world?s most powerful steam, gas, oil and nuclear energy porjects. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII by using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images MANUFACTURING CIRCUIT BREAKERS ENGLAND - MAY 06: Sand is a crucial element in most foundries, hot metal is poured in to a box frame containing sand, shaped under pressure to take the form of the item being moulded. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images PREPARING A MOLD FOR SAND SCOTLAND - MAY 29: Hawick.Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images STIFFENING SWEATERS ENGLAND - MAY 06: Birlec were the major suppliers of industrial furnaces to the iron and steel and foundry industries in Britain and abroad. The brick worker is cementing calcined firebricks in to position, the bricks are designed to withstand the extreme temperatures demanded by foundry processes. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images LAYING BRICKS ENGLAND - MAY 06: Harland Engineering of Bletchley began in 1915 and later developed and supplied control management systems to a variety of industries eventually specialising as Harland Simon in computer controlled systems. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images PINNING CIRCUIT WIRE ENGLAND - MAY 29: Rugby.Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images TESTING VOLTAGE ENGLAND - MAY 29: Knowles Carpets, Peel Mills, Bolton. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images MAKING CARPETS ENGLAND - MAY 06: Grubb Parsons of Heaton, Newcastle Upon Tyne made an outstanding contribution to the development of astronomical instrumentation and lead the post war renaissance in telescope making. The company was celebrated for high quality reflecting telescopes which were in use many observatories worldwide. The company active at Heaton since 1925 built as its final piece the remarkable 4.2M William Herschell telescope at Mount Palma Observatory in the Canary Isles in 1987. Photograph taken in 1962 for Engineering magazine by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images PREPARING A TELESCOPE PART ENGLAND - MAY 06: Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images WASHING A CHOCOLATE TANK ENGLAND - MAY 29: Thomas H Ward. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images WELDING ENGLAND - MAY 06: Acheson Electrodes, Wadsley Bridge. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images MAKING ELECTRODES ENGLAND - MAY 06: Transformers and other power industry products are tested at the labs of AEI. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images TESTING VOLTAGE ENGLAND - MAY 06: Pirelli General Cable Company. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images SHEATHING CABLE ENGLAND - MAY 29: The Brown Street sock factory Leicester. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images) Walter Nurnberg/SSPL via Getty Images DESIGNING SOCKS



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