*** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU ISLAND, JAPAN, JUNE 2016: The fireflies typically light up at evening, and they can control their light by flashing it in patterns - saving energy and communicating with each other, Japan, June 2016. THOUSANDS of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama, 37, has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerising images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red. The light is created due to a type of chemical reaction called bioluminescence', and was originally believed to be used for warning purposes, but now its main purpose is thought to be used in mate selection. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

The Most Beautiful Fireflies You've Ever Seen

One photographer captures the magic of a summer's eve

Of the many joys that a summer night brings, the flickering of fireflies is certainly among the most magical. In these photos, taken on the Japanese island of Shikoku two years ago, photographer Kei Nomiyama has managed to taken pictures that capture less of what fireflies actually look like than the impressionistic mood they create.

*** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU, JAPAN - JUNE 16: Fireflies pepper the forest on June, 16, 2015 in Shikoku, Japan. SWARMS of fireflies illuminate the undergrowth in a Japanese forest - providing an enchanting night-time spectacle. The tiny insects make it appear like someone has been painting with light, as they fly through the night at the beginning of the rainy season. These beautiful photographs were captured on Shikoku - the smallest of Japan's four main islands. Photographer Kei Nomiyama has visited the area every year since 2012 to captures the enchanting images. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Media UK Office, London. T +44 845 370 2233 W www.barcroftmedia.com USA Office, New York City. T +1 212 796 2458 W www.barcroftusa.com Indian Office, Delhi. T +91 11 4053 2429 W www.barcroftindia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Media / Barcroft Media via Getty Images) Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images ILLUMINATI *** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU, JAPAN - MAY 24: The fireflies make it appear like someone has splashed gold paint on a canvas on May, 24, 2015, in Shikoku, Japan. SWARMS of fireflies illuminate the undergrowth in a Japanese forest - providing an enchanting night-time spectacle. The tiny insects make it appear like someone has been painting with light, as they fly through the night at the beginning of the rainy season. These beautiful photographs were captured on Shikoku - the smallest of Japan's four main islands. Photographer Kei Nomiyama has visited the area every year since 2012 to captures the enchanting images. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Media UK Office, London. T +44 845 370 2233 W www.barcroftmedia.com USA Office, New York City. T +1 212 796 2458 W www.barcroftusa.com Indian Office, Delhi. T +91 11 4053 2429 W www.barcroftindia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Media / Barcroft Media via Getty Images) Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images FAIRY DUST
*** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU ISLAND, JAPAN, JUNE 2016: Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red, Shikoku Island, Japan, June 2016. THOUSANDS of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama, 37, has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerising images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red. The light is created due to a type of chemical reaction called bioluminescence', and was originally believed to be used for warning purposes, but now its main purpose is thought to be used in mate selection. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
*** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU ISLAND, JAPAN, JUNE 2016: The light is created due to a type of chemical reaction called bioluminescence, and was originally believed to be used for warning purposes, but now its main purpose is thought to be used in mate selection, Shikoku Island, Japan, June 2016. THOUSANDS of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama, 37, has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerising images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red. The light is created due to a type of chemical reaction called bioluminescence', and was originally believed to be used for warning purposes, but now its main purpose is thought to be used in mate selection. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

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*** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU ISLAND, JAPAN, JUNE 2016: The fireflies typically light up at evening, and they can control their light by flashing it in patterns - saving energy and communicating with each other at Shikoku Island in Japan, June 2016. THOUSANDS of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama, 37, has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerising images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red. The light is created due to a type of chemical reaction called bioluminescence', and was originally believed to be used for warning purposes, but now its main purpose is thought to be used in mate selection. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images) Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images LIGHTS ON THE WATER *** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU ISLAND, JAPAN, JUNE 2016: The fireflies typically light up at evening, and they can control their light by flashing it in patterns - saving energy and communicating with each other, Shikoku Island, Japan, June 2016. THOUSANDS of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama, 37, has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerising images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red. The light is created due to a type of chemical reaction called bioluminescence', and was originally believed to be used for warning purposes, but now its main purpose is thought to be used in mate selection. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images) Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images LIGHT ALONG THE PATH *** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU ISLAND, JAPAN, JUNE 2016: Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red, Shikoku Island, Japan, June 2016. THOUSANDS of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama, 37, has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerising images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red. The light is created due to a type of chemical reaction called bioluminescence', and was originally believed to be used for warning purposes, but now its main purpose is thought to be used in mate selection. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images) Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images STREAMERS *** EXCLUSIVE *** SHIKOKU ISLAND, JAPAN, JUNE 2016: Photographer Nomiyama captured the stunning photos using a long exposure - where the lens of the camera would have been open for between 5 and 15 minutes, Shikoku Island, Japan, June 2016. THOUSANDS of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama, 37, has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerising images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Fireflies produce a 'cold light' from their bodies, which is a chemically produced light that can shine bright yellow, green, or red. The light is created due to a type of chemical reaction called bioluminescence', and was originally believed to be used for warning purposes, but now its main purpose is thought to be used in mate selection. PHOTOGRAPH BY Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Kei Nomiyama / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images) Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images THE FOREST FLICKERS



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